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20130113
20130121
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
's happening in the political world and the economy which we're in. the situation with the gun violence is very close to home, because i do enjoy -- even though i'm 60, i still go out and hunt and shoot a deer and kill a turkey to eat. host: thank you very much. by the way, the full presentation by the president yesterday, you can certainly watch atlanta cspan.org. good morning, what kind of work do you do? caller: i'm in the mental health field. each level of the patients have had different mental health issues. and i have really been waiting for this issue to come up, because that's what concerns me the most. i have worked with people that have multiple personalities. we have been scared to death. they pick beds up. they have tremendous anger in there. i don't think they get the proper care that they need. and after a while, they're released and that is something that i'm really concerned with. it's not about who is able to get a gun, who is able to have a gun. that's not the issue right here. the issue is that we have to start dealing with people with mental health issues. i have worked in a
of rules that have been established that are impossible to meet without doing severe damage to the economy. we're not going to put ourselves in a position where, in order to pay for the spending we have already incurred, where the two options are we were way to either profoundly hurt the economy, hurt seniors, hurt kids trying to go to college or we will blow up the economy. we will not do that. not whatever congress does. they will have to send me something that is sensible. we should not be doing this in a one-three month time when. why should we do that? where the united states of america. we cannot manage our affairs in such a way that we pay our bills and provide certainty in terms of how we pay our bills? look. i do not think anyone would consider my position on reasonable. major, i am happy to have a conversation about how we reduce our deficits. i'm not going to have a monthly or every three months conversation about whether or not we pay our bills. that in and of itself does severe damage. even the threat of default hurts our economy. it hurts our economy as we speak. if we want t
the replacement level. and that's causing concern for california's economy because the retirement population grows and there are fewer workers to replace them. in the meantime birth rates have gone up in texas, georgia and florida. >>> 7:35. the trial and a massive corruption case involving an entire southern california city starts this week. the mayor, vice mayor and four former council members from the city of bell are charged with misappropriation of city money. prosecutors claim the city leaders looted the city's treasury to pay themselves huge salaries. the biggest compensation package was for the city's chief administrative officer of $1.5 million. jury selection begins tomorrow. >>> some san francisco muni workers earned a lot of overtime in the last fiscal year. the "san francisco chronicle" reports one supervisor worked more than 2200 hours of overtime. that's the same as working a second full-time job. in 22 of the top 25 earners in the entire city worked for muni. muni's chief says most of the overtime is due to maintenance work being done when fewer vehicles are in service which is mos
escalates the fight on the w economy. is the debt ceiling negotiable? your thoughts? send us a tweet or post your comment on facebook. you can also send us an e-mail. president obama held his last official news conference of the first term yesterday in the east room of the white house. here's what he had to say on the debt ceiling debate. [video clip] >> republicans and congress have two choices. they can act responsibly and pay america's bills or they can act irresponsibly and put america through another economic crisis. but they will not collect ransomed in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people well-being is not a leverage to be used. the full faith and credit of the united states is not a bargaining chip. they had better choose quickly, because time is running short. the last time republicans in congress even flirted with this idea, r. triple-a credit rating was downgraded for the first time in our mystery, our businesses created the few jobs in any month in nearly the past three years, and the whole fiasco added to the deficit. ho
spend on everything from education to public safety less as a share of the economy that has been true for a generation. that is not a recipe for growth. we have to do more to stabilize the finances over the medium and long-term, and also spur more growth in the short term. i have said i am hoping to making modest adjustments to programs like medicare to protect them for future generations. i also said we need more revenue for tax reform by closing loopholes for the wealthiest americans. if we combine a balanced package of savings from spending on health care and revenues from closing loopholes, we consult the deficit issue without sacrificing our investments in things like education that are going to help us grow. it turns out the american people agree with me. they listened to an entire year's debate over this issue, and they made a clear decision about the approach they prefer. they do not think it is fair to ask a senior to pay more for his or her health care or a scientist to shut down like that saving research so that a multi millionaire investor can take less in tax rates then a
the private and the public economy, balance between the cost and hoped for advantages, balance between the clearly necessary and the comfortably desireable, balance between our essential requirements as a nation and the duties imposed by the nation upon the individual, balance between actions of the moment and the national welfare of the future. good judgment seeks balance in progress, lack of it eventually finds imbalance and frustration. >> words of president eisenhower 52 years ago. are those words relevant today as he talked about what government can and cannot do in solving problems. that speech is still available online. and pointing out those remarks giving the country a dire warning about what he described as a threat to democratic government. he also used the phrase military industrial complex. since then that has become a rallying cry of opponents for expansion. in an effort to control the expansion of the military industrial complex the president sought to cut the pentagon's budget. he wanted a budget he said the country could afford. share your thoughts about the role you t
is up 5,550 points since then, just shy of the 14,000 mark. the economy is growing. instead of contracting. in the first quarter of 2009, the gdp contracted 5.3%. it grew 3.1% when the last time it was officially measured. though remains below where it was before the great recession, consumer confidence has nearly doubled. and a larger percentage of americans, 41%, according to our last poll, believe the country is headed in the right direction, up from 26% in january, 2009. on the other hand, there is plenty of data to support the idea that the drink country is not better off than it was four years ago. and that the struggling economy continues to take a toll on families. median household income is lower than it was in 2009. and 46 million americans live below the poverty line. several million more than four years ago. the federal public debt has increased from 10.6 trillion in january 2009 to 16.4 trillion now. then there's the big number that's exactly the same as it was four years ago. the unemployment rate. 7.8%. though it's down from, of course, a high of 10% in octobe
on that investment? are you benefiting from that? is there enough tax being generated in the economy to offset that and when a disaster occurs are you on the hook for all the infrastructure and everything else that may be required to rebuild that community? and isha return on that exposure greater than what your payoff would he? now the taxpayer, the answer unfortunately is too often now. we have subsidized risk to a point where as long as no extreme event occurs, it seems okay. but when the extreme event occurs you are now exposed to much greater costs without necessarily generating revenue or other societal benefits offsetting that risk. now, through the 70s and 80s and early '90s, when a lot of growth was taking place in growing coastal areas and other areas very few storms were occurring. the frequency was down so the illusion was i a pitcher for 3030 years and this never happened. the problem with climate and weather is 30-year cycles are like an eyelash in understanding how these systems work. notts talking about any other issues and now we find ourselves in this increased activity and y
the economy collapse. and in classic washington fashion, this is the case with the schoolhouse is on fire and rather than focusing on putting the fire out, everyone in washington runs out to use as much water. the budget deficit is the economy right now. that's the to 50 minute like that but that's the truth. i think it would be great if an organization with strength and integrity of a or b. would stand up and make the point because we're having an entire budget that is basically premised on something that is not true. >> i agree with you. we do have underlying pieces of our economy that need to get fixed. but massive change in spending and we've already cut a trillion dollars over all in spending. we've cut medicare as part of the political their act. we have to be really careful and just solving these problems by cutting spending. .. >> we do it in a way that supports families and the population that we have. >> let me just add to that. i agree with you, but unfortunately, most of the people on social security will be on fixed budgets. and so there's still a danger having out-of-pocket
in exchange for not crashing the american economy. the financial well-being of the american people is not leveraged to be used. >> he's talking about bipartisan, but you would agree that he's also playing politics here or no? >> i'm not going to second-guess what the president, his motives and everything. i can tell you, there's a lot of democrats who believe we need to cut spending also. and we need to get our house financially in order. with that, we're hoping it happens sooner than later. i've always been for the bowles/simpson approach, which was a big fix, so we don't go through these crises every two or three months. it's ridiculous. we've kicked the can so much, there's nothing left. we've got to come to grips and sit down and work through this. it's taken longer than needed. that's why congress -- it's really broken in washington. it's really what no labels and why jon and i are here. we're looking for solutions and a venue that we can sit down and work out our differences. and this is the one i think works well. >> jon huntsman, we're already hearing this discussion about
job creation and the american economy. today we will hear from s.e.c. commissioner danny gallagher who i think is well-positioned to lay out an agenda for this in the next year. we hope this is an agenda that can attract strong bipartisan support. mr. gallagher brings a unique combination of backgrounds. he started as general counsel for a financial services firm. then joined the staff of commissioner paul atkins and worked for commissioner, worked for the -- at the f.c.c. as deputy director and then acting director in one of the largest divisions. he's been on the senior professional staff, then was in private practice and about 14 months ago was confirmed by the u.s. senate as securities and exchange commission commissioner. i think everybody who who knows him will know several things about him. he is smart, he understands the complex issues. second, he is -- he has an ability to see another person's perspective and find consensus and make forward progress on issues and understands that you can achieve consensus while still remaining true to principle and finally that he is a great p
and undermine their idealism. if we permit our economy to drift and decline, the vulnerable will suffer most. we must live up to the calling we share. civility is not a tactic or a sentiment. it is the determined choice of trust over cynicism, of community over chaos. and this commitment, if we keep it, is a way to shared accomplishment. america, at its best, is also courageous. our national courage has been clear in times of depression and war, when defending common dangers defined our common good. now we must choose if the example of our fathers and mothers will inspire us or condemn us. we must show courage in a time of blessing by confronting problems instead of passing them on to future generations. together, we will reclaim america's schools, before ignorance and apathy claim more young lives. we will reform social security and medicare, sparing our children from struggles we have the power to prevent. and we will reduce taxes, to recover the momentum of our economy and reward the effort and enterprise of working americans. we will build our defenses beyond challenge, lest weakness invite
forward. it's a shame, chris, that when you look at the greatest challenge the american economy has, is the american congress. that's a shame. >> what do you do? how do you move forward? i was talking this morning to your counterpart on the republican side, former utah governor jon huntsman, and, you know, he is -- there's a key word there i just used, former. how do you get the people who are involved in the process right now who can have this influence, to get on board and really do sit down in that meeting room and listen and talk and negotiate? >> chris, right now i've been in senate for two years. you know we have not had the first bipartisan caucus yet, not one time have we sat down organized by leaders for us to sit down in 100 chon or at any time in two years to talk about the problems and if we had commonality. >> what does it take to make that happen, senator? >> well, this is what no labels is all about, the problem solvers. we're saying if it's not going to happen from the top, maybe those of white house are frustrated as i am that wanted to do something that came to was
, when you consider the impact of drought in the economy, in some nations in africa it has been up to 9% of the gdp of the nation's. for instance, in zimbabwe or even in kenya. so when you consider all this, i think more need to be done for preparedness and for early action. unfortunately the question is why is it the information on early, early warning, i think it's because first, drought is not a kind of charismatic disaster. it's not like tsunami or earthquake. it has little subterranean impact. second, we're experiencing more frequent drought. we are reluctant to take action on early warning because maybe they're concerned about taking action and being found wrong. so uncertainty is something that scientists alike. i think my third point also might be that one might say why should we act so early? we may undermine the capacity of committee. so when you put all these together, you may have some reasons why early warning is not leading to early action. >> thanks for the question. this issue crosses pretty much everything we are going to hear. why you said that information about the fu
have the will to the poverty a priority with in this country? >> you have to have the real economy. but we have now? i am amazed -- you could talk about public education, we could talk about health care. everyone knows that a single payer health care system would -- insurance would cover everyone. insurance companies would be gone. cost, quality, access would be at a premium in terms of our ability to be a civil society if we had a single payer health care system. we could generate almost 3 million jobs, which would serve to stimulate the rest of the economy when you are building -- and actually taking care of the people. they know that in washington. viable. -- valuable. they just want to privatize it. i think you all doing a beautiful job -- the nurses appreciate you so deeply. honestly, the progressive caucus, the black caucus -- but one of the things that you said, and i completely agree, is that you have got to push. we have got to treat a movement in this country -- occupy was a moment. it needs to start up and keep going -- it needs to bring millions of people with it. the r
in an effort to fight lower enrollment rates due to the bad economy. is this trend going to continue? joining us to talk about it is university maryland economist peter morris se789. half of the declines, why are more young are deciding to forgo college education? >> the cost have jumped a lot and the graduates can't find jobs. there is a sense that it doesn't pay out. you get set with a lot of big loans and join the service, learn a trade. go to a community college and skip university all together. >> gregg: president obama wants everybody to go to college? >> it doesn't pay out. most stated universities offer diplomas that don't lead to a marketable skill. there are too many graduates working at starbucks these days. >> gregg: "wall street journal" analyzed this way. take a look at this. facing stagnant family income, shaky job prospects and a smaller pool of high school graduates, more schools are reining in tuition costs. is it possible that some tuition costs may actually go down, or we simply talking about slowing the rate of increase? >> i think it's slowing the rate of increase. it's
that we have a uniform rule of economy gent circumstances. that, her suggestion complies with your objection. >> well, if i'm understanding it correctly, i think our point is this, which is that the police officers have to act reasonably in the situation. in the situation they know for sure the evidence is going to be lost, they know that every minute is critical, for example -- >> so many situations in which we require a warrant, nevertheless. when there's drug dealing in a house, every time -- it's almost a certainty that they're going to use the drugs, and that evidence is going to disappear. you rely on knowing that there's likely to be telltale signs left over. and that's the same thing you do in an alcohol situation. you rely on the testimony of the police officer, you rely on the implied consent presumption. it's not as if this is destruction of all evidence. and not like a fleeing situation where someone gets away, you have nothing left. this is vastly different. >> i mean, with respect we disagree. this evidence is critical, and the number matters. i mean, it is the case t
to the economy, particularly given what happened the last time they took the debt ceiling hostage? >> look, what heritage put out today is drivel. a transparent attempt -- >> drivel, this is the considered view of an important organization. >> yeah, whose president is jim demint. i don't take it all that seriously. >> okay. >> what they're saying is, well, the government could pay the interest on its bonds, but you could then cut everything else, social security, medicare, education. what they're ignoring is the fact that you would shake the confidence of markets all over the world with unpredictable consequences. this could be of the order of lehman brothers in 2008. john boehner actually knows this. he said the other day that a default would be a financial disaster, and he's taking his folks to their retreat, their weekend retreat somewhere in right wing fantasy land and he has a power point -- >> i believe it's in virginia so please be respectful of that state. >> i love that state. i think there's going to be a cul-de-sac of craziness going on there. he has to persuade these people and he ha
promises. or helping the economy. how did you weigh those? when he makes a promise on the plus side, does he get a plus on at 500 or does he get a negative? the net -- the next time, does he get guest: we have a category called obama's top promises. you can look at those and you can see that i think his record of fulfilling them is not quite as high as overall. you make a good point -- some of his promises were sweeping and thematic and others were very specific. there were two that were lighthearted -- we included two promises like that. one was his promise during the campaign that he would buy his daughter as a puppy which is a promise kept in the other was that he would fight for a college football playoff system which we also raided a promise kept indeed, you could say this is the aggregate and you need to look in on the more narrow numbers. we published an article yesterday but we welcome anybody who wants to tally them up in different ways and provide an analysis. all promises are not created equal. host: we are looking at the top promises on politifact - tell us more about compromi
of the congress is becoming the nation's dysfunction and we are becoming disfigured in a sense, the economy s because congress is so far behind in the game. so the premise is a simple one, and that is that we want to create a new attitude around problem solving. how do you do that? you have to get a critical mass together of problem solvers which is what we are doing. we have 25 signed on and the goal by the end of the year is to have 75. so if you can imagine 75 republicans and democrats house and senate members agree to meet and check the ego at the door and sit around the table to put the country first as opposed to party and the next election and thinking about the future when they deliberate about the very important issues, that is the objective, and so far as i can tell, candy, and i'm a recent convert to this, and they came to me most recently, there is nobody else in the world of movements now that is focused on bringing people together around the premise of problem solving. >> well, certainly, there have been third way, and a lot of the groups out there that have sort of tried this,
and mathematics backgrounds to stay in the u.s., use those skills to grow our economy, help our country, rather than go back to their home country. host: the white house sees hope for bipartisan deal on immigration based on what senator marco rubio of florida, republican, has put out there. he's put some ideas out there. do you -- do you endorse liz ideas? guest: i have not spoken to senator rubio yet, but we welcome those ideas. there are others in the house that are working on specific proposals and wider ranging proposals, and we want to take a look at this. you know, we are a nation of immigrants. there is not a person to be found who's a u.s. citizen who can't go back a few generations or several generations and find someone in their family who came to the united states to better their lives. my grandfather came from germany. my wife's parents came from ireland. this is a very, very common thing. we are also a nation of laws. so finding a way to address this issue and fix a very broken immigration system will entail looking at a lot of different pieces of this, including enforcement and wh
of this country, because the consequences of a default would ripple throughout the economy. i just saw an article yesterday that said the people are now drawing on their retirement funds, the middle class of this country. so we now want to have a debt ceiling threat that would cause further erosion in the stock market, that would essentially make things begin to go haywire? i guess the republicans are going to be thinking this weekend how to proceed. i think they need to proceed with sensibility and common sense instead of an effort to be so extreme that you threaten the economy of the country. host: house republicans leaving for a retreat tomorrow to discuss - guest: they should retreat from the idea of using the debt ceiling. host: you referenced "the wall street journal" this morning. many republicans see a debt limit showdown as risky. pat toomey said tuesday he would introduce legislation next reconstructing the white house to prioritize the government's bills. what's wrong with that idea? guest: we have had some deficit reduction. as the president laid out a couple days ago, we have had ove
to be on the agenda, but the economy and getting a growth agenda going is clearly what's going to be most important across the board for americans. but he's got some wind at his back. because the republicans know that number one, immigration is an issue they can't ignore and vilify anymore, they've got to deal with it, guns is another one. they're mired in a tactic on plunging this country into default and starting to come to their senses and realize this debt ceiling is a tactic that is really turning its head against them not against the president. so i think that you're always going to see the president making the effort to reach out. and spending, he's actually done that already. and that's where he's going to have to work with democrats as well as republicans. >> well, you supported both abolishing the debt limit and having the president use the 14th amendment. i'm wondering how you see the debt ceiling play out. >> well, i'm seeing the republicans starting to cave on that. they're hearing from the -- the president has made it clear he's not going to play that game. and if we mess with the deb
's about the health of our city, our towns. it's about the health of our neighborhoods and our economy. it's about the health of our schools, and our school children, and our communities and the health of our neighbors. mayor bloomberg, the people of new york have seen is an effective, results oriented mayor, one of the most effective results oriented mayors ever to serve new york, or dare i say, any city. creating jobs, expanding opportunity, improving city schools, launching america's largest affordable housing initiative. quite honestly, everything they do in new york and said to be the largest initiative, but i should say also largest and one of the most innovative affordable housing initiatives. and also fighting crime. really showing us that the people of new york have shown the people of baltimore that it is possible to make a safer tomorrow, that we do not have to resign ourselves to the circumstances of the way things have always been, or what we have never been able to do in the past. and, in fact, we can save lives, and each life is precious. each life is important, and if you s
for the economy, and they would rather fight on things like shutting the governor down or automatic spending cuts going into effect, and they think that forces the president to negotiate. >> on "meet the press" this morning, what do you have? >> we will talk about the big issues dominate, the guns and debt, and senator schumer, and we have a political roundtable as we tee up the big things facing the president. >>> let's check in with chuck. >> beautiful weather outside early on your sunday morning. a cloudless sky over washington and the early morning rays of sunshine brightening our eastern sky, and a golden glow on the eastern horizon this morning. it's not cold at all outside this morning. the temperature at national airport, 41 degrees, and you say, it's chilly outside. our average high temperature this time of the year is 43. so this is a mild start for sure. that southwesterly breeze at 9 miles per hour has a hint of a windchill out there so you will need some sort of a jacket outside if you will spend anytime outside. 30 degrees in manassas. that's one of the cold spots by far. many areas
and the economy and education, we know how they're strapped. i have four s.r.o.'s at one time. i now have one. that's not a desired situation by the school or by my department. yes to the funding piece. to the mental health piece, the s.r.o.'s, they know the kids. they know when they don't look right. what's going on today? they have friendships and they talk. someone else will say, have you seen his facebook page, or i am being taken down, bullied on facebook and all the things that lead us to mental health issues. and in regard to mental health issues, today, the officer on the street gets called because someone is having an episode of some nature and maybe a family member calls or maybe a co-worker calls or maybe they're just out and about having some sort of episode. the officer comes, evalue waits and determines, something is going on. this person needs to be seen. they've committed no crime a lot of the time, but you can't believe. so they in minnesota and i think this is similar throughout our country execute what's called the 72-hour hold. a lot of people say, good. the situation is r
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)